Completed Window Trim

Last week I promised to show you how we completed the trim around the windows. It was nice and simple to add 1.25″ window/door stop trim around each edge and filled out the gap nicely.

 

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Any of the other small gaps were easily filled with caulking and quickly forgiven.  :-) Basically the right side of the window is what I’d do if the window where in the middle of the wall or around a door.  Overall, it was pretty easy, so long as you measure well.

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Since I also wrote about installing crown molding, here are a couple of pictures of it installed. #nightmares I’ve already wood filled and caulked the crown as well as primed the window trim and closet shelving.

Window Trim

Crown Molding

Closet Shelving

Crown Molding

And that’s about it for where we’re at! We have a light fixture but have yet to hang it and I’m leaving the space unfinished as my dad works his magic on the staircase and oh-my-goodness you should see it! It’s going to be AMAZING. He’s truly magnificent at his craft and I can’t wait to show you!

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Entryway Window Trim

I know…I’ve been MIA again. Let’s face it, I have no real blogging schedule and just need to do it when I feel like it. Work’s been killer lately and I’m getting burnt out with only that to think about so today I decided to take a time out and fuel my creativity and blog for a few minutes. So Friends, I feel like it. :-)

First, a few updates: If you saw on Instagram or Facebook, my father is working on our next piece-de-resistance with our staircase! I’m so excited! It’s coming together beautifully so far and I can’t tout his talents enough! Finish carpentry work is amazing and as I challenge myself with doing a little more and a little more, I am continually impressed with all he knows. BUT we’ll do a stair update another day so I can share all we have planned and how amazing it is!

Since it’s way more critical to leave areas as open and non-disruptive for my Dad while he’s working, we’ve put on hold any more work in the Entryway (we’re now calling it an entryway vs. a mudroom… sounds more fancy, right?) but I did manage to get the window trimmed out and crown molding put up.  The Window I did pretty great on, if I do say so myself.  The crown molding… well, I’ll start by saying it’s THE HARDEST THING I’VE EVER DONE IN MY ENTIRE LIFE. 

I ran out of stock. I cried twice. I’m never doing it again.

It’s done, though, and after pliable forgiveness (caulking) and some tips from Dad on minimizing scarf joints (I’ll explain later), I think it looks pretty nice. All in all, this room is one I’ve challenged myself with completing mostly everything on my own and I did it. Needless to say there’ll be no tips or tutorials from me. If you every plan on trying it. Best of luck to you.

Back to the window! We’ve got two windows opposite the closet and my goal was to trim them out as one opening. We’re matching the rest of the house’s new trim with farmhouse window trim, similar to what we had put around our new window openings.

Window Trim

Window Trim

I started with the sill and after measuring and cutting returns in the middle and at each end, I slipped it in for a dryfit. I used a 1×4 board here.

Window Trim

I had to notch out a portion of the board to raise over a little lip in our framing, so did so with my Dremel after marking down pencil lines. This would have been way faster with a table saw but I don’t have one so made due and it fit like a glove.

Window Trim

Window Trim

The next piece I put on was the 1×4 apron at the window base.

Window Trim

The the 3 vertical pieces went up, which would join to the header. On a standalone window this would be 1×4’s again, but since I had one end abutting a wall, a custom width in the middle, and a clear end I had to customize.  The far end of the window got a 1×2 board, the middle I had to trim down a 1×8 to match the wall width there, and then the end got a 1×4.

Window Trim

Now for the header – a tidy little sandwich of 1×2, 1×6, 1×2 to give it that clean craftsman/farmhouse look.

Window Trim

And that’s where I stopped for now. You can see that I still needed to trim out around the window itself.

Window Trim

I had about 1.75″ to cover and meet the new trim so needed to do some shopping for what worked. It was pretty simple and you’ll love the finished look as much as I do, I promise.  Next time…

All in all, this window took me about 3 hours worth of work, but I had the sill notching to do, plus the customized trim sizes on the end and middle and really this was 2 windows, not one, so that’s really not bad. I enjoyed myself and that’s all that matters!

For more indepth tutorials on this type of trim, you can check out my “Trim it Out” board on Pinterest! There are so many great tutorials and examples of how you can add to this trim or make it more simple as well.  My house will have a few variations of the same, but all in all they’ll all read very similar which will work from room to room.

Thanks for stopping in!

 

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Antique Hardware and a New Mirror

After we repainted the master bedroom the old mirrors above the bureau didn’t seem to fit in or match. The gold I had painted the square target frames I picked up inexpensively wasn’t quite right and honestly I was looking for something a little more sophisticated this time around.  I found a really nice oval mirror on Joss and Main for about $100.  It has a thick silver border and hangs from a brown leather belt that matches width, about 2-3″ wide. I thought the belt was a nice nod to “dressing” which certainly happens to occur in this room.

Mirror

Mirror

The mirror can hang independently, which is great since I wouldn’t want to rely on the belt alone. I wanted to give the impression that the belt was hanging off an antique doorknob, due to it’s thickness, and that’s when I got to do a little craft. I have a couple of antique doors in the basement that I have ideas for and they came with all sorts of antique hardware including one with a white porcelain knob.  Old knobs are traditionally a mortise lock set so are hollow in the back. In order to attach the knob to the wall, I’d have to add a screw of sorts to add it to the drywall and fill the hollow area with resin to hold the screw. It’s hard to describe, but maybe the pictures will show what I mean.

Antique door knob hanger

Antique Door Knob Hanger

I bought a general craft resin off of Amazon and hope I can think of more projects to do with it – I have a ton left over!  To avoid the resin leaking out of the screw holes on the side of the knob,  I wrapped the metal base in scotch tape to cover the openings. Antique door knob hanger

I then followed the instructions on the package and mixed equal parts of both the Resin and the Hardener in a disposable cup.

Antique Door Knob Hanger

Antique Door Knob Hanger

I filled the hollow portion of the knob, inserted the screw for the anchor and let it set up for 24+ hours making sure the screw was setting up vertically and not angled to the side in any way.

Antique Door Knob Hanger

Antique Door Knob Hanger

Once it was set up I glued the back plate on with gorilla glue and allowed that to set.  That was a personal preference for sure. I thought the back plate would look nice and add some visual weight behind the knob on the wall.  We worked together to find a comfortable hanging height and up it went.

Antique Door Knob Hanger

The oval shape is a great to accommodate the height differences of Jake and myself. It’s nice that I can choose earrings but Jake and can still take a peek at himself after getting ready. It also really compliments the feel of the room being a bit more sophisticated and understated, but unique enough to feel collected and thoughtful.

Antique Door Knob Hanger

Antique Door Knob Hanger

It’s nice making these small updates to our master bedroom slowly now that I finally feel more comfortable with the color and feeling of the space. We’ve added some art pieces from Minted that give us the feeling of some memorable vacations and make our environment feel really personal.

Admittedly we’re moving slowly with the spaces we’re working on now, but more conscientiously if that makes sense at all. I have no regrets about it. Taking our time to fill walls with art, choose paint colors, pick furniture and even lay the flooring in the mudroom is allowing us time to digest each decision and not just rush to completion.  I think the stumbling along the way (like with Drizzle) are good learning experiences and allow us to accept this slow-down with ease.  You have to make some sour lemonade now and again to figure out the perfect balance of sour and sweet. We’re 5 years into this house and still learning along the way…that’s the fun of it, right?

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