Entryway Window Trim

I know…I’ve been MIA again. Let’s face it, I have no real blogging schedule and just need to do it when I feel like it. Work’s been killer lately and I’m getting burnt out with only that to think about so today I decided to take a time out and fuel my creativity and blog for a few minutes. So Friends, I feel like it. ūüôā

First, a few updates: If you saw on Instagram or Facebook, my father is working on our next piece-de-resistance with our staircase! I’m so excited! It’s coming together beautifully so far and I can’t tout his talents enough! Finish carpentry work is amazing and as I challenge myself with doing a little more and a little more, I am continually impressed with all he knows. BUT we’ll do a stair update another day so I can share all we have planned and how amazing it is!

Since it’s way more critical to leave areas as open and non-disruptive for my Dad while he’s working, we’ve put on hold any more work in the Entryway (we’re now calling it an entryway vs. a mudroom… sounds more fancy, right?) but I did manage to get the window trimmed out and crown molding put up. ¬†The Window I did pretty great¬†on, if I do say so myself. ¬†The crown molding… well, I’ll start by saying it’s THE HARDEST THING I’VE EVER DONE IN MY ENTIRE LIFE.¬†

I ran out of stock.¬†I cried twice.¬†I’m never doing it again.

It’s done, though, and after pliable forgiveness (caulking) and some tips from Dad on minimizing scarf joints (I’ll explain later), I think it looks pretty nice. All in all, this room is one I’ve challenged myself with completing mostly everything on my own and I did it. Needless to say there’ll be no tips or tutorials from me. If you every plan on trying it. Best of luck to you.

Back to the window! We’ve got two windows opposite the closet and my goal was to trim them out as one opening. We’re matching the rest of the house’s new trim with farmhouse window trim, similar to what we had put around our new window openings.

Window Trim

Window Trim

I started with the sill and after measuring and cutting returns in the middle and at each end, I slipped it in for a dryfit. I used a 1×4 board here.

Window Trim

I had to notch out a portion of the board to raise over a little lip in our framing, so did so with my Dremel after marking down pencil lines. This would have been way faster with a table saw but I don’t have one so made due and it fit like a glove.

Window Trim

Window Trim

The next piece I put on was the 1×4 apron at the window base.

Window Trim

The the 3 vertical pieces went up, which would join to the header. On a standalone window this would be 1×4’s again, but since I had one end abutting a wall, a custom width in the middle, and a clear end I had to customize. ¬†The far end of the window got a 1×2 board, the middle I had to trim down a 1×8 to match the wall width there, and then the end got a 1×4.

Window Trim

Now for the header – a tidy little sandwich of 1×2, 1×6, 1×2 to give it that clean craftsman/farmhouse look.

Window Trim

And that’s where I¬†stopped for now. You can see¬†that I still needed to trim out around the window itself.

Window Trim

I had about 1.75″ to cover and meet the new trim so needed to do some shopping for what worked. It was pretty simple and you’ll love the finished look as much as I do, I promise. ¬†Next time…

All in all, this window took me about 3 hours worth of work, but I had the sill notching to do, plus the customized trim sizes on the end and middle and really this was 2 windows, not one, so that’s really not bad. I enjoyed myself and that’s all that matters!

For more indepth tutorials on this type of trim, you can check out my “Trim it Out” board on Pinterest! There are so many great tutorials and examples of how you can add to this trim or make it more simple as well. ¬†My house will have a few variations of the same, but all in all they’ll all read very similar which will work from room to room.

Thanks for stopping in!

 

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